Bulletins

February 10, 2019

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In Louisiana there is a long history behind the celebration of Mardi Gras (French for "Fat Tuesday" and a reference to the last day before the beginning of Lent). On 3 March 1699 a new fort on the Mississippi River 60 miles south of what is now New Orleans was christened "Point du Mardi Gras" by the French explorer Pierre Le Moyne d'Iberville. It was the day before Ash Wednesday. His brother Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne Bienville founded New Orleans in 1718, sixteen years after having established Mobile as the first capital of La Louisiane Fran├žaise. New Orleans became the third capital of French Louisiana after Biloxi, another city founded by the French explorer, held the title for three short years.

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February 3, 2019

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When he begins to vest, after having washed his hands, the priest or deacon places the amice over his head and then wraps it around the collar of his shirt or cassock. Religious whose habit incorporates a hood cover their head with it before placing the amice on top. Then both the hood and the amice are slid down after all the vestments have been donned. As he kisses the cross on the amice and first touches it to his head, he prays:

"Impone, Domine, capite meo galeam salutis, ad expungandos diabolicos incursus."
"Lord, set the helmet of salvation on my head to fend off all the assaults of the devil."

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January 27, 2019

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"See in your white garment the outward sign of your Christian dignity. With family and friends to help you by word and example, bring that dignity unstained into the everlasting life of heaven."

These words happen at just about every baptism nowadays. They are among my favorite phrases of the baptism ritual. In the extraordinary form of Baptism the words are very similar: "Receive this white garment, which mayest thou carry without stain before the judgment seat of Our Lord Jesus Christ, that thou mayest have eternal life. Amen." The words are accompanied with the placing of a white cloth on the newly baptized baby, which used to be my least favorite part of the sacred event. The little one almost always is already wearing a beautiful white gown on top of which the additional white cloth can seem to be an unnecessary accessory.

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January 20, 2019

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Conversion of St. Paul by Peter Paul Rubens

Conversion of St. Paul
January 25

by Peter Paul Rubens
(1577-1640)

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January 13, 2019

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The Baptism of the Lord
as depicted in an orthodox church,
strong and humble
Son of God & Son of Man.
Baptistery of Neon (c. 430)

Commenced by St. Urso, Bishop of Ravenna (399-426)
Completed by Neone, Bishop of Ravenna (450-473)

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