Bulletins

January 14, 2018

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BEHOLD THE LAMB OF GOD!!

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January 7, 2018

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Gerburt Christi
Franz von Rohden, 1852

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December 31, 2017

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When the angels went away from them into heaven, the shepherds said to one another, "Let us go over to Bethlehem and see this thing that has happened, which the Lord has made known to us." And they went with haste, and found Mary and Joseph, and the babe lying in a manger. And when they saw it they made known the saying which had been told them concerning this child; and all who heard it wondered at what the shepherds told them. But Mary kept all these things, pondering them in her heart. And the shepherds returned, glorifying and praising God for all they had heard and seen, as it had been told them.

And at the end of eight days, when he was circumcised, he was called Jesus, the name given by the angel before he was conceived in the womb.

Luke 2,19-21


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December 24, 2017

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The Second Vatican Council's earth-shattering document on Divine Worship that envisioned "radical adaptation of the liturgy... [which] entails great difficulties" (Sacrosanctum Concilium, 40) still sought to preserve the universal language of the Roman Catholic Church:

"Nevertheless steps should be taken so that the faithful may also be able to say or to sing together in Latin those parts of the Ordinary of the Mass which pertain to them." (SC 54)

In 2002 the revised General Instructions for the Roman Missal issued by Pope St. John Paul II reiterated that "since faithful from different countries come together ever more frequently, it is fitting that they know how to sing together at least some parts of the Ordinary of the Mass in Latin, especially the Creed and the Lord's Prayer, set to the simpler melodies" (GIRM 41).

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December 17, 2017

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The things we do for love.

For over a thousand years the only liturgical color was white. In Pope Innocent III (1198-1216)

"we find for the first time a determination of liturgical colors for specified days, along with the respective significance thereof. His rules are more or less those still in force today: white as the festive color (and he tries to discover a reason for the white-even in the white of the clouds on Ascension Day!), red for martyrs' days and Pentecost, black for days of penance and for Masses for the Dead, green for days without a festal character (Innocent III, op. cit., I, 65 (PL, CCXVII, 799-802). Cf. Braun, Die liturgische Gewandung, 729-736. Cf. E. G. Atchley, "Liturgical Colours," in V. Staley, Essays on Ceremonial (London, 1904), 89-176.). The sensuous interest in colors and the zeal in explaining their significance were alike manifestations of the spirit of the Gothic period."

(Jungmann, Mass of the Roman Rite, p 112)


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